Programme de cirque de Hippodrome Circus 1983 PDF

Programme de cirque de Hippodrome Circus 1983 PDF to navigation Jump to search This article is about the theatre in the West End. For the theatre in the London Borough of Barnet, see Golders Green Hippodrome.


A major contributor to this article appears to have a close connection with its subject. This article needs additional citations for verification. The Hippodrome is a building on the corner of Cranbourn Street and Charing Cross Road in the City of Westminster, London. The London Hippodrome was opened in 1900. The tank featured eight central fountains, and a circle of fountains around the side. Entrances at the side of the auditorium could also be flooded, and used for the entry of boats.

In 1909, it was reconstructed by Matcham as a music-hall and variety theatre with 1340 seats in stalls, mezzanine, gallery, and upper gallery levels. It was here that Tchaikovsky’s Swan Lake received its English première by the Ballets Russes in 1910. The Hippodrome hosted the first official jazz gig in the United Kingdom, by the Original Dixieland Jazz Band, in 1919. The original interior was demolished in 1958, and Bernard Delfont had the Hippodrome converted into the nightclub The Talk of the Town. In 2009, the Hippodrome was named by the Brecon Jazz Festival as one of 12 venues which had made the most important contributions to jazz music in the United Kingdom. The London Hippodrome by nightclub tycoon Peter Stringfellow in 1983. Some years later, Stringfellow sold it to a chain company called European Leisure.

Under the stewardship of David Chipping the club went on to win many BEDA and DI awards, regularly attracting crowds in excess of 2,000. The police also shut down most of the venues in the local area. In January 2006, entrepreneur Charmaine Haig took over the lease of the Hippodrome building on a short term before a casino licence application could be secured for future use. Haig initially maintained and managed the empty venue on her own, and then changed the venue’s name back to the London Hippodrome from its previous name of Cirque. Shortly afterward, Haig’s in-house events company, Hip Events, began running private events in the venue, but once again using the space to its full capacity as a variety venue with album launches, dance shows, gala dinners, awards ceremonies and Leicester Square film premiere after parties. In 2008, Haig and her business partner acquired a theatre licence for the venue and subsequently turned the venue back into a theatre. October 2008, the show previewed at the London Hippodrome with great success, and stayed running until the end of Haig’s Hippodrome lease in June 2009.

In 2009, the lease on the Hippodrome was acquired by Leicester-born father and son entrepreneurs Jimmy and Simon Thomas, who began an extensive restoration programme taking the Hippodrome back to Matcham’s original designs for use as a casino and entertainment venue. 40 million, the funds being raised by the Thomas family from the sale of a number of bingo halls prior to the UK smoking ban, which made it illegal to smoke within an enclosed workplace, on 1 July 2007. The Hippodrome Casino was opened on 13 July 2012 by Mayor of London Boris Johnson, who described it as « yet another ringing endorsement of London as a great place to invest ». The venue on opening included four floors of gaming, including a Gold Room casino sited in the original basement with access directly into Chinatown to the rear of the building, Heliot restaurant, six bars, a smoking terrace and The Matcham Room cabaret theatre.